Over my…

DC Code § 7-201

(3) “Dead body” means a human body or such parts of such human body from the condition of which it may be reasonably concluded that death recently occurred.

Too long for a tweet but oh so good

D.C. Code § 7-205

(d) When a birth occurs on a moving conveyance within the United States and the child is first removed from the conveyance in the District, the birth shall be registered in the District, and the place where it is first removed shall be considered the place of birth. When a birth occurs on a moving conveyance while in international waters, air space, in a foreign country or its air space, and the child is first removed from the conveyance in the District, the birth shall be registered in the District, but the certificate shall show the actual place of birth insofar as can be determined.

UPDATE: Turns out this is model language. The 1992 Model State Vital Statistics Act can be found here, and there is a new Model Act in the review process.

Laws of the Day

Some sections of the DC Code that caught my eye today:

§ 3-1104. Restriction on job training program combined with sprinkler installation program.
Any job training programs chosen to be combined with a sprinkler installation program shall perform their job training activities within the District of Columbia.
§ 3-342.01. Definitions.
For the purposes of this subchapter, the term “Baseball Stadium” shall have the same meaning as that provided for the term “Ballpark” in § 47-2002.05(a)(1)(A).

Presidential Inaugural Ceremonies

Skimming the DC Code and I come across Presidential Inaugural Ceremonies after 1998. The statute gives Council the authority to issue rules, which struck me as kind of…off-putting? since rules are generally the province of the executive/Mayor. But whatever. A bit further along I notice reference to streetcars, and of course we’re in the process of getting streetcars now, again, but in 1998 there weren’t streetcars, so why did the law mention them?

Then I get to Presidential Inaugural Ceremonies after 1956 and it all becomes almost clear. In skimming, I noticed no differences — NONE — (though again, I was only skimming) in content between the two. The only differences were in format.

Why do I say “almost clear”? Because 1. the 1998 law was passed by Congress (which explains the keeping of Council-as-rule-maker, but why wasn’t the law the doing of Council?) and 2. if there’s no difference, then why the new law?

Anyone have insight on this?

Marriage

Did I fool you into thinking that this would be a political post?

Sorry, no such luck. Just wanting to point out an inconsistency I came across while skimming the DC Code regarding public sector workers’ compensation. (Not injured on the job. Putting together some information about DCHR.) DC Code 1-623.01, definitions:

(9) The term “child” means one who at the time of the death of the employee is under 18 years of age or over that age and incapable of self-support, and includes stepchildren, adopted children and posthumous children, but does not include married children.

(10) The term “grandchild” means one who at the time of the death of the employee is under 18 years of age or over that age and incapable of self-support.

Notice: the definition of “child” excludes married children. The definition of “grandchild” does NOT exclude married grandchildren.

Any thoughts as to why?